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Child Advocacy Resources And Information

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The following is a list of some of the local, state and national organizations that provide information and resources regarding child sexual abuse and Children’s Advocacy Centers. We hope you find it helpful.

Resources for parents and caregivers:

What parents need to know about sexual assault:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/caring-kids-what-parents-need-know-about-sexual-abuse

Teen sexual assault fact sheet:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/teen-sexual-assault-information-parents

Staying safe while staying connected and keeping children safe online:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/staying-safe-while-staying-connected-tips-caregivers

Child sexual assault fact sheet:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/child-sexual-abuse-fact-sheet-parents-teachers-and-other-caregivers

Coping with the emotional stress of the legal system:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/child-sexual-abuse-coping-emotional-stress-legal-system

Child sexual abuse FAQ:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/questions-and-answers-about-child-sexual-abuse

Child sexual abuse treatment FAQ:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/questions-and-answers-about-child-sexual-abuse-treatment

Sexual development and behavior information:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/sexual-development-and-behavior-children-information-parents-and-caregivers

Understanding and coping with sexual behavioral problems:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/understanding-and-coping-sexual-behavior-problems-children-information-parents-and

Parent guide for when a child discloses sexual assault:  
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/what-do-if-your-child-discloses-sexual-abuse-guide-parents-and-caregivers

Sexual assault within a relationship and a one-time interactions (webinar):
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/when-no-not-enough-information-teen-sexual-assault

Parent’s response to sibling sexual abuse (webinar):
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/sibling-sexual-abuse-parental-and-clinical-perspective

Addressing secondary traumatic stress (webinar):
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/secondary-traumatic-stress-professionals-treating-child-sexual-abuse  


Resources for children and teens:

Sexual assault fact sheet for teens:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/teen-sexual-assault-information-teens

It’s never your fault: a sexual assault fact sheet for teens:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/its-never-your-fault-truth-about-sexual-abuse

Sex or Sexual assault?
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/sex-or-sexual-abuse-respect-yourself-know-difference  


Resources for professionals (therapist, supervisors, agencies working with children and sexual assault):

Self-care strategies:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/taking-care-of-yourself

Child sexual abuse FAQ:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/questions-and-answers-about-child-sexual-abuse

Child sexual abuse treatment FAQ:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/questions-and-answers-about-child-sexual-abuse-treatment

Addressing secondary traumatic stress:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/secondary-traumatic-stress-professionals-treating-child-sexual-abuse


Resources for both parent and child:

NCTSN resources related to sexual assault:
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/select-nctsn-resources-related-teen-sexual-assault

Frequently Asked Questions

Wouldn’t A Child Who Has Been Sexually Abused Be Fearful Of The Offender?

Sexual abusers often “groom” their victims by giving gifts, attention, and/or special privileges. This grooming process insures continued access and secrecy with the victim. The abuser may also be a close friend, member of the family, or someone else that the victim loves or looks up to.

As The Protective Caregiver - What About My Feelings?

Caregivers of victims also have a variety of emotions following a disclosure of abuse. Common emotions experienced by caregivers are guilt, sadness, shock, anger, and even depression. If the abuser is also a caregiver, there may be worries about housing and economic issues that must be considered. Although the caregiver’s emotions may be strong, it is important that the child believes that the caregiver can handle the disclosure or the results. The child, if he/she feels that the emotions created by the disclosure are too intense, may withdraw thinking that this will lessen the strain on the caregiver. It is vital that the caregiver speak to another competent adult, NOT the child, about their complex and strong feelings. It may be helpful for the parent to seek treatment with a counselor who is experienced in working with the families of victims.

Caregivers also must separate their own emotions from those of the victim. Caregivers can help the victim express his/her own feelings about the abuse. This can be especially difficult for caregivers who experienced abuse themselves as a child. Watching a loved one go through abuse may bring up old emotions. It is important that the caregiver resolves these feelings with a competent adult or counselor and NOT the child.

Support groups with other caregivers of victims can also be very helpful during this time. Information on groups is available at your local children’s advocacy center.

Can A Child Consent To Having Sex With An Adult Or Much Older Child/Teenager?

No. Because of age, size and/or the nature of the relationship, adults have power and authority over children. Children, therefore, do not have the maturity to equally consent to a sexual act with an adult or much older child. Each state has laws that define the legal age at which a child can consent to a sexual activity.

Does Child Sexual Abuse Involve More Than Touching?

Sexual abuse can take on many forms such as fondling, penetration, exposure of private parts, participation and/or viewing of pornography, and communicating with a child in a sexualized manner.  All forms are serious and must be addressed by law enforcement, child protective services, and/or medical professionals.

How Can I Find Out About Sex Offenders In My Area?

Sex offenders are required to register with law enforcement when they move or after their release from prison/jail. A list of sex offenders registered in Kentucky can be accessed via the internet at kspsor.state.ky.us. This information can be obtained by calling toll free 1-866-564-5652. At this number, an individual can register up to 3 zip codes to monitor and a phone number. When a registered sex offender moves into and/or within that three zip code area, the Kentucky State Police willnotify the phone number provided.

Although the registration, phone notification, and website system is helpful, it is not 100% accurate. Even though there is a punishment if a convicted sex offender does not register, some offenders do not register. Also, some offenders “plead out” of their cases and therefore may not have to register, if their plea agreement does not include a registerable offense. Persons convicted of sex crimes before July 15, 1994 are not required to register for those crimes. Offenders who are not reported, charged, and convicted are not required to register.

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